Lake Atitlán



Pick your Spanish School in Lake Atitlán: Big School Small School Prices given in US$ per week include host family You decide which works better for you, big or small, social interactions or disciplined tuition. Fun Work Community School $201 San Pedro Chool $264

About Lake Atitlán


When the hippies moved south, they discovered their paradise: Lake Atitlan, a huge volcanic cauldron filled with water. Around the lake are 12 idyllic Indian villages named after the 12 apostles. In Panajachel, the town where people from Guatemala City like to spend their vacations, you can learn Spanish. The city sits on a river delta and is full of hotels, restaurants and souvenir stores. Still, there is a large local population to interact with while studying. The other choices are San Pedro and San Marcos.

These villages, like Panajachel, are divided into two parts: The beach part with international "comedores" - where you can find meditation, falafel and marijuana cookies, and endless parties - and the local village further up in the hills. The lake is the result of a massive volcanic gas explosion just 86,000 years ago. This event blasted many cubic kilometers of fertile ash onto the Guatemalan highlands, creating the foundation for a rich highland Mayan culture. The water level of the lake has fluctuated considerably over the years, and there are sunken cities to explore in the water. From here you can take volcano tours, hike around the lake, take boat trips, scuba dive, and visit local cooperatives.

About Lake Atitlán


When the hippies moved south, they discovered their paradise: Lake Atitlan, a huge volcanic cauldron filled with water. Around the lake are 12 idyllic Indian villages named after the 12 apostles. In Panajachel, the town where people from Guatemala City like to spend their vacations, you can learn Spanish. The city sits on a river delta and is full of hotels, restaurants and souvenir stores. Still, there is a large local population to interact with while studying. The other choices are San Pedro and San Marcos.

These villages, like Panajachel, are divided into two parts: The beach part with international "comedores" - where you can find meditation, falafel and marijuana cookies, and endless parties - and the local village further up in the hills. The lake is the result of a massive volcanic gas explosion just 86,000 years ago. This event blasted many cubic kilometers of fertile ash onto the Guatemalan highlands, creating the foundation for a rich highland Mayan culture. The water level of the lake has fluctuated considerably over the years, and there are sunken cities to explore in the water. From here you can take volcano tours, hike around the lake, take boat trips, scuba dive, and visit local cooperatives.